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S.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) - $65 (near Grass Lake)

S.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) 1 thumbnailS.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) 2 thumbnailS.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) 3 thumbnailS.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) 4 thumbnailS.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) 5 thumbnailS.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) 6 thumbnailS.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) 7 thumbnailS.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) 8 thumbnailS.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) 9 thumbnailS.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) 10 thumbnailS.S. Matsonia menu en route to Honolulu (3 wks. Before Pearl Harbor) 11 thumbnail
condition: good
make / manufacturer: S. S. Matsonia
size / dimensions: 12 x 9 inches
The S.S. Malalo (“flying fish”) was built in 1926 to take passenger from San Francisco to Honolulu, Hawaii. In 1937,, the ship was remodeled to accommodate 693 First Class passengers. Renamed the S.S. Matsonia, it became a lavish ocean liner designed for the rich.

Slightly over three weeks after this menu was made, Pearl Harbor was bombed, WW II began, and the Navy retrofitted the Matsonia to haul 3000 troops to Pacific Theater war zones.

The cover of the menu has retained its bold colors of 83 years ago. The art is named “The Essence of Aloha” by Frank Macintosh, featuring a ukulele surrounded by lush Hawaiian vegetation.

The inside menu is also in great shape. The main course that day was either broiled spring chicken or prime rib.

Apparently, at some point, a previous owner had this menu displayed for its artwork because of some adhesive residue on the back cover. Luckily, the back cover didn’t have any graphics on it anyway.

The menu measures slightly less than 12 x 9 inches.

What makes this menu so important is that it was most likely the last passenger voyage for the S.S. Matsonia until after WW II ended.

The date on the menu is significant, November 11 (Ironically Veterans Day), 1941, slightly over three weeks before Pearl Harbor was bombed.

I’m not sure how much longer the ship traveled to Hawaii after November 11. Either way, for the passengers and crew, they made it out alive in the nick of time.

post id: 7735773657

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